An ARISS contact is planned with the students of Lycée Jean Moulin, Les Andelys, France

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International Space Station Amateur Radio (ARISS) has received a schedule confirmation for ARISS radio contact with astronauts.

ARISS is the group that sets up special amateur radio contacts between students from all over the world and licensed crew members on the International Space Station (ISS).

This will be a Multipoint Telebrider Contact via Amateur Radio between the ISS and the students of Lycée Jean Moulin. Students will take turns asking ISS astronaut Thomas Pesquet, amateur radio call sign KG5FYG, during the ARISS radio contact. French is the language that will be used for this contact. The downlink frequency for this contact is 145,800 MHz and can be heard by listeners who are in the ISS footprint which also encompasses the radio telephoto station ARISS.

David Payne, a member of the ARISS team, using the NA7V call sign in Portland, Oregon, will serve as the relay amateur radio station. Each student asking a question on the ARISS radio will be in conference from his home or social distance at school.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for May 20, 2021 at 10:38 a.m. CEST (Les Andelys, France) (8:38 a.m. UTC, 4:38 a.m. EDT, 3:38 a.m. CDT, 2:38 a.m. EDT, 1:38 a.m. PDT).

The Lycée Jean Moulin (LJM) is a rural vocational school with around 1000 students aged 15 to 20. Students from local primary and secondary schools will also participate in the ARISS contact. LJM’s educational programs include STEM courses that lead to professional baccalaureate degrees in various scientific and technological fields. The school also offers internship opportunities in the aviation and space industry. LJM is partnering with ArianeGroup, an aerospace company, and the Normandy Aerospace Club, which has supported the school’s students in various aerospace and engineering projects. Some of these include building and programming a Mars Rover, developing model Ariane rockets, robotic programming, and developing star-tracking technology for a telescope. LJM is also partnering with members of the Radio Club of Vernon who will support the ARISS contact.

When time permits, students will ask these questions:

1. How do you feel about being the first Frenchman to be appointed captain of the ISS?
2. What are your physical and mental preparations for your mission on the ISS?
3. What are the long-term impacts of weightlessness on the body?
4. What are the psychological impacts of living in space?
5. How are your days going?

6. How are the beds in the ISS?
7. What type of scientific experiments do you do during your mission?
8. How can we identify the stars in the ISS?
9. The body ages faster in space. Did you have any problems during your previous mission?
10. Can the human species reproduce in weightlessness?

11. Are there personal commonalities between astronauts?
12. How do you cope being away from your family?
13. How is the return to earth going?
14. What do you want to do first when you come down to earth?
15. As a Normand what is your favorite cheese?

16. Do you have dehydrated cheese? And if so it is as good as on earth?
17. How do you respond to the theories of the “Platists”?
18. What is the hardest thing to do for a mission in space?
19. Have you seen the Earth deteriorate over time in the ISS?
20. In 2023 Vernon is the president of Ariane towns a few kilometers from our school. Could you come see us and tell us about your experience?

Translation

1. How does it feel to be the first Frenchman to be appointed captain of the ISS?
2. What are your physical and mental preparations for your mission on the ISS?
3. What are the long-term impacts of weightlessness on the body?
4. What are the psychological impacts of living in space?
5. What’s your day?

6. What do the beds in the ISS look like?
7. What kind of scientific experiments do you do during your mission?
8. How can we identify the stars on the ISS?
9. The body ages faster in space. Did you have any problems during your previous mission?
10. Can the human species reproduce in zero gravity?

11. Are there personal commonalities between astronauts?
12. How do you feel about being away from your family?
13. How is the return to earth going?
14. What is the first thing you want to do when you come back to earth?
15. As a Norman, what is your favorite cheese?

16. Do you have dehydrated cheese? And if so, is it as good as it is on earth?
17. How do you respond to the theories of the “platists”?
18. What is the hardest thing about completing a mission in space?
19. Did you see the Earth deteriorate while you were spending time on the ISS?
20. In 2023, Vernon is the president of Ariane towns a few kilometers from our school. Can you come and tell us about your experience?

ARISS – Celebrating 20 Years of Continuous Amateur Radio Operations on the ISS

About ARISS:

Amateur radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative enterprise of international amateur radio societies and space agencies that support the International Space Station (ISS). In the United States, the sponsors are the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation (AMSAT), the American Radio Relay League (ARRL), the ISS National Lab-Space Station Explorers, and the NASA Space Communications and Navigation Program.

The main objective of ARISS is to promote the exploration of subjects related to science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics. To do this, ARISS organizes programmed contacts by amateur radio between the crew members on board the ISS and the students. Before and during these radio contacts, students, educators, parents and communities participate in hands-on learning activities related to space, space technologies and amateur radio. For more information, see www.ariss.org

Media contact:
Dave Jordan, AA4KN
ARISS PR

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